How Do I Purchase the Right Camera?

July 24, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

Since I have signed up to be a photography instructor at the local community college I have received a few of the same questions. It’s cool because they were the same questions I asked when I started in photography. The main question is…

I'm looking into taking your course and was wondering if you had and recommendations for a good starter camera? A buddy, who is also a pro, suggested cannon rebel t2i/t3i. Thoughts? Suggestions?

Here is my most professional, been there, feared that, answer.

Purchasing my first camera took me four months of wasteful research.  I think what happens is the rip-off factor comes into play or the thoughts of “this” camera takes better images than the other one shakes our psyche.  While I do believe that high end (professional/full frame) cameras take better images the lower end ones (the ones in Best Buy) have some advantages.  Here is what I tell people.

  1. What do you want to do with your camera? If you really vision getting into taking very nice images and trying/ purchasing better lenses then go with a low end “prosumer” camera.  These cameras run in the $1000 to $2000 range. They can handle the high end attachments that you can borrow or rent.  The lower end “consumer” ones cant. The t3i is a decent camera but a little too automatic for my style.  The more expensive the camera the more you have control over everything…controlling all aspects of the images capture is how the great photos are created. Don’t research too much you will just get confused with too much information. If you go T3i and really like photography you will hit a wall with that thing within the first year. That’s $500 down the drain unless you can resell that camera and get $200 back. With Canon making new cameras every week there is more confusion. So, as of now if I was going to buy a camera because I wanted to get into photography (and didn’t know what I know through experience) I would purchase the new 70d. It has the latest bells and whistles and more advanced features than the 60d (which came out last year and is now outdated).  Now, knowing what I know and how I use my cameras I would at least spend the money on the 6D. At $2000 and a few millimeters off of true full frame you can’t beat that. At the time I started the 50d was $1200 and it was a  tough call. That is how I made my decision. I am glad I went prosumer and spent the extra $500. Also note, when I started I hadn’t used a SLR camera in 8 years and my photo skills were garbage.

 

  1. You have $5000 just laying around so just get the 5d mark III and call it a day.

 

Don’t even ask me about Nikon or Canon. Well, here is a quick take on that one.  I have heard from Nikon people (mainly my photo coordinator) that Nikon is easier to use and the buttons are easier to understand. My response is “Canon is better (in my shut up, I’m the boss, I can’t hear you, 5th grade kid voice).” Hope this helps. Make a decision and forget about the regret. Photography is about exploration, if a higher end helps you take great pics when you go hiking then don’t sell yourself short. These prosumer cameras will last a good 6 years if you shoot them really hard. Longer if you don’t. See ya in class.

Pierce Brunson
Hit me up on Google+, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter! I have three personas to serve you!

(Pierce Brunson, Pierce Brunson Photography, Firefly Event Photography & Entertainment)

 


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